Sweet and Sour (but mostly sweet)

We all know Panda Express isn’t the way to go if we want to fit into our skinny jeans. In fact, chinese food (fast-food style) was one of the first things I gave up when I decided I needed to be healthier. The hardest thing for me was the orange (duck) sauce.

With it’s sweet gooiness complimented by an after-hint of tang, the sauce was always the best part. I refused to go to any chinese restaurant that didn’t have it and, when it came to the table with those little egg rolls, I would eat the egg rolls just so I didn’t look odd guzzling down bowls of orange gel. 

DSC00039 Bored one day, and finding myself with an abundance of low-carb ketchup approaching its expiration date, I attempted to recreate that beautiful, orange-glo sauce. And, behold, here it is, in all it’s gloriousness (admittedly after an abundance of failed attempts).

Almost Duck Sauce
1T. ketchup (I use heinz one carb)
1-1.5T sugar free apricot jelly or orange marmalade (if you’re scared of the sugar free stuff, use the regular…it’s still better for you than the fast-food places)
.5-1T soy sauce or tamari
.5-1T apple cider vinegar (I assume you could substitute rice, but I had apple cider lying around)
1 packet splenda, equal or the like
garlic powder, onion powder, crushed red pepper, salt and pepper to taste (I usually use a whole teaspoon of garlic powder, but non-garlic obsessed people might want to use less)
→Put in a bowl and mix. You might have to heat the jelly a little first. For the picture above, I stir fried some vegetables and cut up veggie nuggets in a pan and poured the sauce over the mixture.
Or, in pictures…
DSC00035 + DSC00037  = YUMMY!

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4 responses to “Sweet and Sour (but mostly sweet)

  1. Pingback: Rajma Chawal (plus a rework on an old recipe)1 « Thoughts on the Freshman 15

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  4. Pingback: A healthy, multicultural stir-fry with zing, zest and zip! In 10 minutes! « Measured in Pinches: Experiments in Molecular Gastronomy

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